Rêverie électronique: a show for toddlers in which you’re allowed to fall asleep

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Jesse Lucas is in Australia this week with his show Rêverie électronique which will be played at the Adelaide French Festival. This show will take you on a sonic voyage influenced by the ambient music of Brian Eno along with projected images. In this show,  Jesse Lucas invites you to lose yourself in the electronic rêverie and to take a break from the outside world.

We spoke to him about the show.

©Philippe Malet

 

You’re coming to Adelaide for the Adelaide French Festival with your show Rêverie électronique. Tell us about the show.


We could call the show an electronic siesta. I take the spectators diving into a sound and image bath. I propose a break, to focus on the breath, a moment to just appreciate the present moment.

You’re influenced by Brian Eno’s music . How have you been influenced by his music?

I discovered ambient music and Brian Eno’s work during the creation of a previous show which required a lot of work in front of the computer. This music style allowed me to concentrate on my tasks all while guiding me artistically. Following that, I started a weekly series of live improvised sets put up on the internet: The Vanishing Circle. This live series led me to explore different styles of electronic music and got a taste for the creation of ambient music during these sessions.

 

Your show “Rêverie électronique” is designed for toddlers and their parents. Have you always made shows for toddlers?

I have always considered that my creations could be appreciated by a wide number of people. I like to think of a project by imagining the reaction o the audience and I often imagine the reactions of children in the process. In 2009 together with Erwan Raguenes (music, sound) and Jacques-Yves Lafontaine (sound) we created shows for children and all audiences. L’odyssée de Rick le cube  and its sequel Rick le cube et les mystères du temps in 2014.


How to come about that you have made this show for toddlers ?

The shows about the world of Rick the cube set out for children from 5 years old however for a number of years I’ve wanted to work on a creation which could be presented to a very young audience during an interview with Brian Eno he spoke about the fact that his first album of ambient music had been played in birthing rooms in the United kingdom this anecdote motivated me to work on a show of ambient music designed for very young children. and given that I almost exclusively work on audio-visual projects I added video projections on a pyramid.

 

©Philippe Malet

 

Instead of shows for children which typically are full of energy and colour it seems that your show is a lot, it’s described as a world of dreamy sound and image.

I think that this show should carry and bring something more than the aspect of entertainment with Rêverie électronique, I invite children to find this taste for calm and passing the passing of time. Some will spend the time running about and others will relax tranquil e into the arms of their parents but I hope that each one will keep a grain of this experience of suspended time which could be useful in their future lives.

Have you already made audiences fall asleep in your shows normally an artist would be offended if there if their audience fell asleep, no? Is this a show in which it’s the opposite ?

 

Many children have already fallen asleep during my performances and that doesn’t pose any problem for me before inviting the audience to enter the room I allow myself to say a few words to remind them that it is not a problem I think that it’s important that the audience can live the dreaminess as they hear it. There’s not really any code that needs to be followed for this show!



What sorts of images are in the projections which are accompanying the music in the show ?


It’s an island that we discover slowly through the movement of the camera. This island is a little Harbour of peace for the animals that live there and that we see during the voyage. the images won’t tell the story but they remind us of the pleasure of simply watching the waves on the beach or the animals that populate the nature around us. for the little story the images have been created like in a video game and the animals that we observe on the pyramid behave differently in each session.

 

Can people without children attend the show ?

Of course this show is accessible for toddlers and their parents. However, it is open to everyone.

 

Why should we come and see your show Rêverie Electronique?

To simply take the time to allow yourself to be lulled by at the music and the images while comfortably laid out on cushions.

 

Rêverie électronique is on twice a day at 11:15 and at 12:15 this Saturday 12 January and this Sunday 13 January.

Tickets cost $25 for adults or $15 for children. There is also a family ticket (two adults and two children) which costs $65. You can buy your tickets here.

 

REVIEW: Gotye presents a tribute to Jean-Jacques Perrey

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The person we know best as Gotye has reverted to his birth name, Wally De Backer, for his 4 shows at Sydney Festival. In these shows he presents a tribute to the man that he names as his spiritual grand-father and the influence for his music: French musician, Jean-Jacques Perrey.

His love for Perrey’s music as well as for the ondioline, the little-known instrument, on which Perrey played and now, in this show, De Backer plays, is clear. De Backer smiled from the beginning to the end of the show. His passion clearly shown when he speaks between songs about the music, the life of and his meeting with his idol. There was even a moment in which De Backer stopped himself from talking as he realised he had been talking and not playing music for some time.

Wally De Backer photo by Stuart Armit

Accompanying him was Joe McGinty on an instrument called Moogs, a type of synthesiser with a keyboard which was capable of producing a wide range of sounds.

Rob Schwimmer amused the audience with his facial expressions while creating strange and other worldly sounds with the theremin, ondioline and moogs.

Gideon Brazil came on stage for 2 songs to add his clarinet to the rest of the instruments.

Wally de Backer photo by Stuart Armit

The audience was stunned and enthusiastic. Before one particular song, De Backer explained that it was going to show the extent of sounds capable of being produced by the ondioline. He invited the crowd to come closer to the stage to see how he played the ondioline. About 30 people practically ran towards the stage to have this opportunity!

It is a show that not only shows De Backer’s passion but also presents a good summary of some early synthesiser music. It’s a show which is for enthusiasts of De Backer, of Jean-Jacques Perrey, of French music or just of early electronic music.

Unfortunately, it is nearing the end of the show’s tour having played at the MOFO festival last weekend and finishing its run at the Sydney Festival this week. However, if you are in Melbourne you can see the show this weekend at the Melbourne Recital Centre.